super puffy bottlecap necklaces

by Laura Beamer $85.00 $49.95 - 59.95
Handmade
Recycled

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  • the story

Fizzy Fashion Accessories

Aaaaaah...There's nothing like cracking open an ice cold soda pop on a hot day. And these puffy necklaces made from reclaimed bottle caps are equally as cool and just as refreshing. Laura Beamer collects old bottle caps and extends their life by turning them into lighthearted pieces of jewelry. There is also a sense of nostalgia that comes with the vintage look of the caps and the knowledge that they came from the classic glass bottles. You can almost taste the fizzy sweetness of the orange, cherry, grape, lemon-lime and black cherry soda. Comes on a snake chain with double-sided bubble pendant: cherry and black cherry soda, (white and red)(black and red); orange and grape soda, (orange and black)(purple and white); lemon-lime and lemon-lime soda, (white and green)(yellow and green). Made in Oregon. Sold separately.

These items have been discontinued. When they sell out, they will no longer be available. We apologize for an inconvenience.

Only the lemon-lime necklace (center) is available at this time.

  • details
Handmade
Recycled
Item ID
15872
Made from
aluminum, sterling silver
Measurements
chain: 16" L pendant: .5" W x .75" Diameter
Notes
2 mm snake chain
  • the maker

LauraBeamer

Artist Laura Beamer resides in Oakridge, Oregon with her husband Benjamin. Her lively and spirited jewelry made from recycled bottle caps, vinyl records and license plates is a way for her to get the most out of something. And this fun attitude is not just reflected in her work, but in her life as well.

Beamer collects these found objects and then combines them with sterling silver using rivets and cold connections to create casual, but captivating pieces for all ages and fashion styles. This bright artist began her craft career in 1992 when she bought a loom from a neighbor. She taught herself how to weave, but unfortunately had to quit because she was having lower back pain while working at the loom. This injury led to her line of recycled jewelry in 1999. "I looked at those bottle caps in a different way," Beamer says. "It's really cool that every bottle cap has it's own little piece of art!"

Beamer can be spotted buying old records at Goodwill, and her husband Ben and she will even request discarded beer bottle caps at restaurants despite the raised eyebrows that usually ensue.

"It feels good to extend the life of something a little longer," she says. "We live in such a disposable world."

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