sterling silver peace bomb cufflinks

by Elizabeth Suda
Handmade
Recycled
Community Voted
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  • the story

High Impact Fashion

These cufflinks are not only a heat-seeking fashion statement, they are also helping to trigger positive change in the world. Carefully loaded into sterling silver cufflink hardware is a pair of tiny bombs, each crafted in Laos from reclaimed scrap aluminum.

The Laotian tradition of working with scrap metals began in the 1960s as the United States conducted an extended bombing campaign in their effort to contain Communism in South Asia. An estimated 250 million American bombs were dropped in the region over a 9-year period. Attempting to restore order in their lives, the Laotian people began gathering the discarded metal from mortar and flare launchers, spent ammunition magazines and more, and recast them into spoons and other domestic tools.

Now, the creation of these cufflinks not only provides you with a dramatic accessory, but also continues to perpetuate clearing waste metals from Laos, while providing local crafts people with a sustainable income. Enclosed in a drawstring pouch with a card explaining the metal's history. Bomb charm made in Laos; assembled in New York, NY.

  • details
Handmade
Recycled
Community Voted
Item ID
21597
Made from
aluminum, sterling silver
Measurements
.75" L x .75" W
  • the maker

Elizabeth Suda

When her suitcases are unpacked, Elizabeth, a New York native, is at home in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. She may otherwise be found busing through the emerald passes of the Annamite Mountains or strolling along the banks of the Seine. Traveling has been key to her conceptualization of ARTICLE 22 and design process. After nearly two years in the Merchandising Department at Coach, Inc., Elizabeth became curious about how and by whom the goods we consume are made. She ventured to the other side of the world and found a home in SE Asia where she worked, and witnessed the intersection of sustainable economic development and globalization. She consulted for Helvetas, a Swiss NGO, on the income generating potential of handcrafts for the Rural Income through Sustainable Development Project, RISE, worked with a social business that supports women who hand weave textiles from naturally dyed yarns, and designed four clothing collections made from these eco-friendly fabrics, which were presented at Laos's equivalent of fashion week. Recognizing that market linkage and design are major constraints on artisans, she founded ARTICLE 22 to create a traceable link between producers in the east and consumers in the west as well as to share the many stories about the women behind the fabric.Elizabeth studied History and Art History at Williams College and Oxford University. collection

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